Acta Phys. -Chim. Sin. ›› 2016, Vol. 32 ›› Issue (7): 1556-1592.doi: 10.3866/PKU.WHXB201604291

• REVIEW • Previous Articles     Next Articles

Recent Progress of Non-Noble Metal Catalysts in Water Electrolysis for Hydrogen Production

Jin-Fa CHANG1,2,Yao XIAO1,2,Zhao-Yan LUO1,2,Jun-Jie GE1,2,Chang-Peng LIU2,*(),Wei XING1,2,*()   

  1. 1 State Key Laboratory of Electroanalytica Chemistry, Changchun Institute of Applied Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Changchun 130022, P. R. China
    2 Laboratory of Advanced Power Sources, Jilin Province Key Laboratory of Low Carbon Chemical Power Sources, Changchun Institute of Applied Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Changchun 130022, P. R. China
  • Received:2016-03-21 Published:2016-07-08
  • Contact: Chang-Peng LIU,Wei XING E-mail:liuchp@ciac.ac.cn;xingwei@ciac.ac.cn
  • Supported by:
    the National Natural Science Foundation of China(21373199);the National Natural Science Foundation of China(21433003);Strategic Priority Research Program of Chinese Academy of Sciences(XDA09030104);Jilin Provincial Science and Technology Development Program, China(20130206068GX);Jilin Provincial Science and Technology Development Program, China(20140203012SF);Jilin Provincial Science and Technology Development Program, China(20160622037JC);Recruitment Program of Foreign Experts, China(WQ20122200077)

Abstract:

Because of its zero-carbon emission energy, hydrogen energy is considered the cleanest energy. The greatest challenge is to develop a cost-effective strategy for hydrogen generation. Water electrolysis driven by renewable resource-derived electricity and direct solar-to-hydrogen conversion are promising pathways for sustainable hydrogen production. All of these techniques require highly active noble metal-free hydrogen and oxygen evolution catalysts to make the water splitting process energy efficient and economical. In this review, we highlight recent research efforts toward synthesis and performance optimization of noble metal-free electrocatalysts in our institute over the last 3 years. We focus on (1) hydrogen evolution catalysts, including transition metal phosphide, sulfides, selenides, and carbides; (2) oxygen evolution catalysts, including transition metal phosphide, sulfide, and oxide/hydroxides; and (3) bifunctional catalysts, mainly comprising transition metal phosphides, selenides, sulfides, and so on. Finally, we summarize the challenges and prospective for future development of non-noble metal catalysts for water electrolysis.

Key words: Water electrolysis, Hydrogen energy, Non-noble catalyst, Hydrogen evolution reaction, Oxygen evolution reaction

MSC2000: 

  • O646